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Pro bono

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Pro bono 2017

Published December 2017

Law firm partners know that pro bono is key to improving access to justice, but developing a strong practice can be a challenge. Every year, Latin Lawyer partners with the Cyrus R Vance Center for International Justice to conduct a survey to measure the progress of this development across the region’s legal markets, share best practices and celebrate the achievements of the practitioners leading the way.

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On the up

21 December 2017

Our survey results suggest that more partners are participating in their firms’ pro bono programmes. While the increase may be small, the greater involvement of senior lawyers is nonetheless encouraging given the impact it has on a law firm’s overall output

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Build it and they will come

21 December 2017

In its mission to spread pro bono throughout Latin America, the Vance Center has focused on supporting the development of local clearing houses. Here, we explore how these organisations are taking pro bono to the next level

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Leading Lights

21 December 2017

Here we list 56 “Leading Lights”: law firms who responded to our survey and whose pro bono efforts during 2016 stood out

Latin Lawyer and the Vance Center’s annual pro bono survey
Latin Lawyer and the Vance Center’s annual pro bono survey

Latin Lawyer and the Vance Center’s annual pro bono survey

21 December 2017

The findings from our latest joint survey suggest pro bono practices are taking root in Latin American law firms. More firms from a greater spread of countries are taking part, and at the same time, a slew of new clearing houses in the region and the growing reach of established initiatives promise to benefit an increasing share of the region’s disadvantaged. Yet challenges remain; in Latin America there is still a deep-rooted culture that is unobliging to pro bono, while lack of funding and uncooperative governments have slowed pro bono’s progress. Vincent Manancourt reports