Competing forces

Brazil is the epicentre of one of the largest corruption probes in the world, but with at least four different authorities policing the investigation and little coordination between them, companies implicated in Lava Jato are finding it difficult to resume normal business, including participation in public tenders, even if they've signed a leniency agreement. Levy & Salomão Advogados's Alexandre Ditzel Faraco and Rafael Zabaglia consider the competing enforcers putting hurdles in the way of Brazil's anti-corruption leniency programme

Competing forces

Earlier this year the Brazilian federal government auctioned off concessions to operate four airports. All of the winners - in fact, all of the bidders - were foreign investors. Local construction conglomerates, historically very active in bids for large infrastructure projects, were nowhere to be seen.

Events

Events

Latin Lawyer - GIR 5th Annual Anti-Corruption & Investigations Conference

Events

Latin Lawyer 2nd Annual Tax Summit

Insight

Reference

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Construction 2017

Chile

Alfonso Reymond Larraín and Rodrigo Riquelme Yanez

Reymond & Cía

Brazil

Fernando Marcondes, Ricardo Medina Salla, Marlon Shigueru Ushiro Ieiri, Adriana Regina Sarra de Deus and Juliana Yumi Shiina Morato

LO Baptista

All Reference

Guides

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The Guide to Infrastructure and Energy Investment

How to Build Up a Region: Development Banks and Multilateral Financing

Thomas Hechl and Vanessa Pinto Villa

Hogan Lovells LLP

The Role of Project Finance in Developing a Region: Trends and Considerations

Andrés Arnaldos Montaner , Daniel D Bartfeld , Jaime E Ramirez and Roland Estevez

Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP
All Guides